Not seeing the correct location?
  • Click the weather box above. A new browser tab (or window) should open and display the Accuweather website.
  • Type your zip code or City, State and press enter.
  • Select your town.
  • Close the Accuweather browser tab (or window).
Reload the Chronicle website and your location should be correct.
Close these instructions.

Russia will miss Olympic Games

Sports Xchange

The Russian Olympic Committee was suspended for the 2018 Winter Olympics by the International Olympic Committee on Tuesday due to the country’s system of supporting athletes who were using performance-enhancing drugs.

The harsh penalty was delivered to set a precedent that actions like those of the Russians are unacceptable. The IOC also fined the Russian committee $15 million to pay for the doping investigation.

The IOC executive board ruled that Russian athletes who are proven to be clean by passing strict standards will be allowed to compete in the Games at PyeongChang, South Korea. But they will have to compete under the title of “Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR).”

“They will compete with a uniform bearing this name (OAR) and under the Olympic Flag,” the IOC said in its ruling. “The Olympic Anthem will be played in any ceremony.”

IOC president Thomas Bach, who won two gold medals in fencing for West Germany during the 1970s, was disturbed with what was uncovered.

“This was an unprecedented attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and sport. The IOC EB, after following due process, has issued proportional sanctions for this systemic manipulation while protecting the clean athletes,” Bach said in a statement.

“This should draw a line under this damaging episode and serve as a catalyst for a more effective anti-doping system led by WADA.

“As an athlete myself, I feel very sorry for all the clean athletes from all NOCs who are suffering from this manipulation. Working with the IOC Athletes’ Commission, we will now look for opportunities to make up for the moments they have missed on the finish line or on the podium.”

The U.S. Olympic Committee supported the IOC’s decision.

“The IOC took a strong and principled decision,” the USOC said in a statement. “There were no perfect options, but this decision will clearly make it less likely that this ever happens again.”

Canadian women’s hockey legend Hayley Wickenheiser was among the Olympians to express an opinion.

“In light of the decision by the IOC to allow Russian athletes to compete under a neutral flag, I feel compelled as a member of the IOCAC to make it clear to clean athletes of the world and fans of Olympic sport, that there are no winners in today’s decision,” Wickenheiser said in a statement she released on Twitter.

“As a six-time Olympian, I take the sanctity of clean sport and Olympic ideals seriously. I believe in the power of the Olympic Games in its purest form.”

 

This article appears in our print edition and in our Chronicle e-edition (available at 4 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m. Saturday) complete with all photos and special sections.

Click here to subscribe to the Chronicle E-edition

Click here to inquire about print subscriptions